Monthly Archives: November 2005

5 posts

A Journey That Ended in Anguish

[ This is the story of an officer and West Point professor, Col. Ted Westhusing, some of whose last words were: “I came [to Iraq] to serve honorably and feel dishonored.” “A psychologist reviewed Westhusing’s e-mails and interviewed colleagues … [and] concluded that … Westhusing struggled with the idea that monetary values could outweigh moral ones in war.” Thanks to Eva Dadlez for forwarding the piece. –BL ] 27 Nov. 2005 | LA Times by T. Christian Miller Col. Ted Westhusing, a military ethicist who volunteered to go to Iraq, was upset by what he saw. His apparent suicide raises questions. […]

No Thanks to Thanksgiving

[ Here’s another point of view on the Thanksgiving Holiday. –BL ] 23 Nov. 2005 | AlterNet by Robert Jensen One indication of moral progress in the United States would be the replacement of Thanksgiving Day and its self-indulgent family feasting with a National Day of Atonement accompanied by a self-reflective collective fasting. In fact, indigenous people have offered such a model; since 1970 they have marked the fourth Thursday of November as a Day of Mourning in a spiritual/political ceremony on Coles Hill overlooking Plymouth Rock, Massachusetts, one of the early sites of the European invasion of the Americas.

One Roof at a Time

November/December 2004 | Mother Jones by Bill McKibben With no help from the Bush administration — but plenty from Europe, Japan, New York, and California — solar power is edging into the mainstream. If you’re like most Americans, you’ve spent your life invisibly attached to an electric meter. When you wake up and switch on the light, you nudge it forward a little faster. When you toast bread, watch TV, open the fridge, flick on the computer, you push its pace. For all practical purposes, it only goes one way. But in the last few years, a small but quickly […]

Money should work for us, not the other way around

2005 Sept. | Ode by Jurriaan Kamp What is money? Do we need more of it to solve some of the world’s problems? Or is money the cause of them? Ex-banker Bernard Lietaer thinks the latter is the case. And he has the solution: a new kind of money. You have no idea what money is. Bernard Lietaer is too friendly and modest a man to say it that way, but this is the easiest possible way to sum up his message. If you did know what money was, then you — we — would see to it that we […]