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The Perfect Moral Storm: Philosophers Respond to the Impending Anthropogenic Apocalypse

For at least the next 200 years, weather forecasts predict shitstorms, with global temperatures now set to remain elevated for hundreds of years to come. The latest IPCC report explains that our emissions are nearing the point of no return. Even if industrialized nations switched to solar power overnight, it is now too late to fully reverse the planet’s course. Geologists have officially termed this new epoch, where the human species has irreparably shaped earth’s geological history, the Anthropocene. Policymakers no longer have the luxury to decide how we might “stop” global warming. Instead, we have to figure out how we’ll manage amidst climate instability.
Posted in Environmental Philosophy, Ethics, Philosophy, Philosophy Blog, Politics, Social & Political Philosophy

Warren’s Introduction to EcoFeminism

Karen Warren is an ecofeminist scholar, and was Professor and Chair of Philosophy at Macalester College in Minnesota.
Posted in Environmental Philosophy, Ethics, Philosophy, Social & Political Philosophy, Texts Tagged with: ,

Leopold’s Land Ethic

Aldo Leopold on Rimrock above the Rio Gavilan in northern Mexico
Posted in Environmental Philosophy, Philosophy, Philosophy Blog, Texts

Seed’s “Beyond Anthropocentrism”

John Seed
Posted in Environmental Philosophy, Philosophy, Texts

Abram’s “Merleau-Ponty and the Voice of the Earth”

David Abram
Posted in Environmental Philosophy, Philosophy, Texts

The Perfect Moral Storm: Philosophers Respond to the Impending Anthropogenic Apocalypse

For at least the next 200 years, weather forecasts predict shitstorms, with global temperatures now set to remain elevated for hundreds of years to come. The latest IPCC report explains that our emissions are nearing the point of no return. Even if industrialized nations switched to solar power overnight, it is now too late to fully reverse the planet's course. Geologists have officially termed this new epoch, where the human species has irreparably shaped earth's geological history, the Anthropocene. Policymakers no longer have the luxury to decide how we might "stop" global warming. Instead, we have to figure out how we'll manage amidst climate instability.

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