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    - Edmonds and Warburton

    Robert Wright believes that there are a number of key tenets of Buddhism which are both compatible with present day evolutionary theory, and accurate about our relationship with the world and with our own minds. In this episode of the Philosophy Bites podcast he discusses Buddhism, reality, and the mind, with interviewer Nigel Warburton. 

    We are very grateful for support for this episode from the Marc Sanders Foundation

    We are also grateful for the continuing support we receive from donations on Patreon and Paypal.

    - Edmonds and Warburton

    How can we best help other people? Peter Singer has argued that we should give aid. Despite a lifetime spent believing this, Larry Temkin has started to question whether the effects of aid are beneficial. In this episode of the Philosophy Bites podcast he discusses some qualms about Peter Singer's arguments. 

    - Edmonds and Warburton

    Do states have a moral right to exclude people from their territory? It might seem obvious that states do have such a right, but Sarah Fine questions this in this episode of the Philosophy Bites podcast. 

    This episode of Philosophy Bites was sponsored by the Examining Ethics podcast from the Janet Prindle Institute for Ethics at DePauw University. You can subscribe to Examining Ethics on iTunes or listen to episodes at ExaminingEthics.Org

    - Edmonds and Warburton

    How do I know I'm not dreaming? This sort of question has puzzled philosophers for thousands of years. Eric Schwitzgebel discusses scepticism and its history with Nigel Warburton in this episode of the Philosophy Bites podcast.

    This episode of Philosophy Bites was sponsored by the Examining Ethics podcast from the Janet Prindle Institute for Ethics at DePauw University. You can subscribe to Examining Ethics on iTunes or listen to episodes at ExaminingEthics.Org

     

    - Edmonds and Warburton

    What is a robustly demanding good, and what has that got to do with friendship and love? Find out in this episode of the Philosophy Bites podcast in which Nigel Warburton interviews Princeton Professor Philip Pettit about this topic. 

     

    - Edmonds and Warburton

    Philosophers talk about 'knowing how' and 'knowing what'. But what is involved in knowing a person? Katalin Farkas discusses this question with David Edmonds in this episode of the Philosophy Bites podcast.

    This episode was sponsored by the Examining Ethics podcast from the Janet Prindle Institute for Ethics at DePauw University.

    - Edmonds and Warburton

    Are human beings fundamentally different from the rest of the animal world? Can what we essentially are be captured in a biological or evolutionary description? Roger Scruton discusses the nature of human nature with Nigel Warburton in this episode of the Philosophy Bites podcast.

    - Edmonds and Warburton

    The Hard Problem of consciousness is the difficulty of reconciling experience with materialism. In this episode of the Philosophy Bites podcast, in conversation with Nigel Warburton, Anil Seth, a neuroscientist, explains his alternative approach to consciousness,which he labels the 'Real Problem. Anil is a Wellcome Trust Engagement Fellow

    - Edmonds and Warburton

    Why does apparently trivial ritual play such an important part in some ancient Chinese philosophy? Michael Puett, co-author of The Path, explains in this episode of the Philosophy Bites podcast.

    This episode of Philosophy Bites was sponsored by the Examining Ethics podcast from the Janet Prindle Institute for Ethics at DePauw University. You can subscribe to Examining Ethics on iTunes or listen to episodes at ExaminingEthics.Org

    - Edmonds and Warburton

    What is Art? That's not an easy question to answer. Some philosophers even think it can't be answered. Aaron Meskin discusses this question on this episode of Aesthetics Bites. Aesthetics Bites is a podcast series of interviews with top thinkers in the philosophy of art. It is a collaboration between the London Aesthetics Forum and Philosophy Bites and is made possible by a grant from the British Society of Aesthetics.

    - Brian Leiter

    This is all certainly apt (it makes reference to his novel The Plot Against America, in which it is imagined that the pro-Nazi Charles Lindberg was elected President of the U.S.): “It is easier to comprehend the election of an...

    - Brian Leiter

    This is classic (attention most philosophers: your'e in the second row from the top):

    - Brian Leiter

    Back in 2016.

    - Brian Leiter

    ...at 3AM.

    - Brian Leiter

    This was a predictable but also amusing decision. Note that it probably means any public official with a twitter account can not block anyone.

    - Brian Leiter

    This looks interesting, sorry it's 2,000 miles away!

    - Brian Leiter

    MOVING TO FRONT FROM YESTERDAY--UPDATED This bracing and tragic NYT story about a student at Hamilton College should be read by all college teachers. The awful situation in which those local know that a student is in distress but the...

    - Brian Leiter

    ...in the wake of sexual abuse and other scandals. (Do read the letter, it's quite strong.) I saw only three philosophy faculty among the signatories: Janet Levin, Edwin McCann and Gary Watson. (More law faculty signed, including one with a...

    - Brian Leiter

    Another interesting piece on our recent theme; an excerpt: Feminism, as a political movement aimed at the liberation of women, has long theorized gender not as an innate essence, but as a hierarchical system enforcing women’s subservience. Characterizing certain personality...

    - Brian Leiter

    ...just last month. Videos of the talks are here.

    Giant Karl Marx Bestrides Trier • Derek Parfit’s Photography Exhibition Opens • Bertrand Russell Prison Letters Project — News reports by Anja Steinbauer and Tim Beardmore-Gray

    Tim Madigan and Daria Gorlova explain Aristotle’s understanding of good friends and tell us why we need them.

    Tim Delaney and Anastasia Malakhova categorize and analyze the different kinds of modern-day friendships.

    Robert Michael Ruehl calls for a friendly revolution.

    Seán Moran asks amiable Aquinas about amity.

    Stephen Asma says biology needs to understand the purpose – the ‘telos’ – of organisms and systems.

    Stephen Leach and James Tartaglia investigate where the idea of the meaning of life originated.

    How Kim Kavin found herself considering the philosophies of Kant, Mill and Singer at America’s biggest legal dog auction.

    Grant Bartley argues that to say the mind is physical is an abuse of language.

    - Philosophy Now

    Grant Bartley from Philosophy Now (and author of The Metarevolution) is joined by members of London philosophy groups Philosophy For All and the Philosophical Society of England to debate an argument advanced by PFA member Kieran Quill that according to quantum mechanics the universe is mental in nature. Join us to hear the fallout. First broadcast on 29 June 2014 on Resonance FM.

    - Philosophy Now

    Ludwig Wittgenstein worked out how language has meaning, twice. He also thought that some of the most important things we can know we can’t express at all. Grant Bartley from Philosophy Now finds out the meaning and limits of language from guest Daniel Hutto from the University of Wollongong, NSW. First broadcast on 22 June 2014 on Resonance FM.

    - Philosophy Now

    Might Nietzsche be right, claiming that lying is “a condition of life?” – Or Kant, arguing that lying means annihilating human dignity? Is it ever acceptable for governments to lie to the public or for individuals to lie to the government? Anja Steinbauer is joined by politician and philosopher Shahrar Ali and moral philosopher Piers Benn to discuss whether lying can be a good thing. First broadcast on 15 June 2014 on Resonance FM.

    - Philosophy Now

    What is meta-ethics? How does meta-ethics differ from ethics, and what does it tell us about ethics? Why is it important for how we should live our lives? Join Grant Bartley from Philosophy Now and his guests Edward Harcourt from Keble College, Oxford, and Richard Rowland from the University of Warwick, to find the answers to these questions and more. First broadcast on 8 June 2014 on Resonance FM.

    - Philosophy Now

    Join Grant Bartley from Philosophy Now and guests John Callanan from King’s College, London, and Andrew Ward from the University of York to talk about the most important idea you’ve never heard of, and some other persuasive arguments from revolutionary but unfortunately unknown-to-the-world philosopher Immanuel Kant. First broadcast on 1 June 2014 on Resonance FM.

    - Philosophy Now

    Join Grant Bartley from Philosophy Now and guests Philip Goff from the University of Liverpool and Tom McClelland from the University of Manchester as they try to work out how all that electricity between your nerve cells relates to and produces all your experiences and thoughts. First broadcast on 25 May 2014 on Resonance FM.

    - Philosophy Now

    What has Buddhism to offer the 21st Century? Join Anja Steinbauer and her guests, Martin Muchall and Rick Lewis, for a critical discussion of ideas in and about Buddhism. First broadcast on 18 May 2014 on Resonance FM.

    - Philosophy Now

    Isaiah Berlin said of David Hume, “No man has influenced the history of philosophy to a deeper or more disturbing degree.” Join Grant Bartley from Philosophy Now plus guests Jane O’Grady, Peter Kail and James Arnold to find out why. First broadcast on 11 May 2014 on Resonance FM.

    - Philosophy Now

    Look inside the mind of a famous thinker: Grant Bartley from Philosophy Now and writer Daryn Green talk to author and Philosophy Now columnist Raymond Tallis about his latest book, In Defence of Wonder, and about the influences and motivations which have made him a philosopher. Recorded on 31 May 2012.

    - Philosophy Now

    Both philosophy and literature represent the world and reflect on it. They are clearly different, yet converge, overlap and relate to one another in various ways. Can anything be gained philosophically by examining literature? Conversely, does it add to our understanding of literature to look at it from a philosophical point of view? Anja Steinbauer, President of Philosophy For All, and her guests Gregory Currie from the University of Nottingham, Stacie Friend from Heythrop College, University of London, and Edward Harcourt from Keble College, University of Oxford, discuss truth and ethics in philosophy and literature. First broadcast on 27 March 2012 on Resonance FM.

    - jonnypugh

    By Jonathan Pugh   In the second of his three Uehiro lectures on the theme of ‘illness and the social self’, Richard Holton turned to the moral questions raised by addiction. In the first half of the lecture, he outlined an account of addictive behaviour according to which addictive substances disrupt the link between wanting […]

    - Nadira Faber

    By Nadira Faber The coffee you are having with your colleagues at a business meeting does more than keep you awake. Many of us know that caffeine can help with alertness and working memory – the first systematic study on caffeine and performance, sponsored by Coca-Cola, was published over 100 years ago. But did you […]

    - Charles Foster

    By Charles Foster Image: Holly Fisher, a Conservative Christian blogger from West Virginia, posing with gun, Bible, and US flag:  from www.nydailynews.com There was a near universal consensus that Bishop Michael Curry’s sermon at the wedding of Prince Harry and Meghan Markle was magnificent.  ‘Frock Star’, panted the Sun.  The Bishop ‘stole the show…and is […]

    - Katrien Devolder

    Is discrimination against unattractive people (lookism) a serious problem? What are the costs of lookism ? What should we do about lookism? In this interview with Katrien Devolder, Dr Francesca Minerva (Philosopher, Ghent University) addresses these thorny questions.

    - jonnypugh

    By Jonathan Pugh   The number of individuals suffering with dementia is steadily increasing; as such, the moral issues raised by the neurodegenerative diseases that bring about the symptoms typifying dementia are of pressing practical concern. In this context, Richard Holton’s topic for the first of his three 2018 Uehiro lectures (on the theme “Illness […]

    - Mackenzie Graham

    By Mackenzie Graham Crosspost from The Conversation. Click here to read the full article. The development of accessible treatment options for pregnant women is a significant public health issue. Yet, very few medications are approved for use during pregnancy. Most drug labels have little data to inform prescribing decisions. This means that most medicines taken […]

    - admin

    Applications are invited for a full-time Research Fellow position (Grade 7: £31,604 – £38,883 p.a.) to conduct research in philosophy and applied ethics for the research project: Neurointerventions in Crime Prevention: An Ethical Analysis, which is hosted by the Oxford Uehiro Centre for Practical Ethics within the Faculty of Philosophy. This post is fixed-term for […]

    - Neil Levy

    By Neil Levy Last week, I found myself seeing a film I hadn’t planned to. The film I wanted to see (The Death of Stalin) was sold out, so rather than miss my weekly fix, I picked the Amy Schumer comedy I Feel Pretty. I don’t mind a chick flick and I enjoyed Trainwreck, but […]

    - Rebecca Brown

    Last January, an article in the Financial Times broke a story about a men-only charity event run by the Presidents Club, a charitable trust set up to raise money for “worthy children’s causes.” Allegations were made by undercover journalists who attended the black tie event as ‘hostesses,’ 130 of whom were hired to attend the […]

    - Dominic Wilkinson

    by Dominic Wilkinson @Neonatalethics In the light of the media attention today, I have gathered together some of the material relating to the ethics of this case   Previous blog posts: Groundhog Day and Legal Appeals. (What if Alfie Were a Texan?) Harm, Interests and Medical Treatment. Where the Supreme Court Got it Wrong… Where […]

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