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    - Edmonds and Warburton

    What is free will? Do we have it? These are difficult questions. Neuroscience seems to point in the direction of determinism. But Christian List suggests that there might still be room for genuine free will. 

     

    - Edmonds and Warburton

    Some philosophers have drawn very strange conclusions about the nature of reality. Despite this Emily Thomas believes that their work may still be worth studying. They usually have had good reasons for what they concluded. In this episode of the Philosophy Bites podcast she discusses several wildly implausible metaphysical theories with Nigel Warburton

    We are grateful for support from the Marc Sanders Foundation and from our Patreon donors. 

    - Edmonds and Warburton

    Are thought experiments the best way of doing practical ethics? Not according to James Wilson. He thinks we need the rich detail of real cases or complex imaginary cases not a simplified version of reality to make sense of the moral problems we face. 

    We are grateful for support for this episode from the Marc Sanders Foundation and from our supporters on Patreon. 

    - Edmonds and Warburton

    In this episode of the Philosophy Bites podcast, Kate Kirkpatrick, author of a new biography of Beauvoir, Becoming Beauvoir, discusses the relationship between the life and work of Simone de Beauvoir. Beauvoir is often portrayed as applying Jean-Paul Sartre's existentialism to the condition of women. Is this a fair assessment?

    We are grateful for support from the Marc Sanders Foundation

    - Edmonds and Warburton

    'What is a woman?' has become a contentious question with practical implications. The philosopher Kathleen Stock gives an account of the category 'woman' and how we should think about it. She gives a different answer to this question which Amia Srinivassan addressed in a previous Philosophy Bites interview on this topic.

    - Edmonds and Warburton

    Christian Miller believes that there is a character gap, a gap between what we think we are like morally and how we actually behave. In this episode of the Philosophy Bites podcast he explores the psychology of moral behaviour, and how we can become better people. 

    We are grateful for support from the Marc Sanders Foundation

    - Edmonds and Warburton

    Where did ethics come from? Philip Pettit tells an 'as if' story about the birth of ethics that is designed to illuminate what ethics is and why it evolved on this episode of the Philosophy Bites podcast.

    We are grateful for support from the Marc Sanders Foundation and from Patreon donors for this episode. 

    - Edmonds and Warburton

    Philosophers often talk about possible worlds. Is this just a way of describing counterfactual situations? As Helen Beebee explains, some of them believe that possible worlds actually exist. This episode of the Philosophy Bites podcast is supported by the Marc Sanders Foundation and by Patreon donations. 

    - Edmonds and Warburton

    Throughout its history there have been challenges to the status of philosophy. Paul Sagar discusses some of these in this episode of the Philosophy Bites podcast.

    We are grateful for support from the Marc Sanders Foundation in making this podcast, and for donations from Patreon patrons. 

    - Edmonds and Warburton

    Is it always good to be trustworthy? Can trustworthiness come into conflict with other values, such as generosity? Katherine Hawley discusses these and other questions about trustworthiness with Nigel Warburton in this episode of the Philosophy Bites podcast. 

    We are grateful for support from the Marc Sanders Foundation and from our Patreon subscribers for this episode. 

    - Brian Leiter

    Unbelievable. And some of these morons think that the First Amendment protects their right to endanger public health: it doesn't.

    - Brian Leiter

    Here, with an article summarizing the findings here. An excerpt from the latter: Overall, 1140 (9.6%) infection preventionists responded. Almost 70% of respondents represented a healthcare system rather than a single facility, and facilities ranged from hospitals (42.7%) to ambulatory...

    - Brian Leiter

    ...which will begin testing people and issuing "immunity certificates" to those who have antibodies for the new coronavirus.

    - Brian Leiter

    ...from Dr. Matt Deaton, an experienced on-line philosophy teacher.

    - Brian Leiter

    That's one takeaway from the first chart in this NYT story: Metro area Population cases Per thousand Wuhan, China 11.1 mil. 50,821 4.59 Lombardy region, Italy 10 mil. 34,889 3.48 New York 20 mil. 43,016 2.15 Albany, Ga. 153,000 206...

    - Brian Leiter

    There seems to be a consensus among some experts: compare Dr. Scott Gottlieb's report for the American Enterprise Institute with Dr. Ezekiel Emanuel's recent op-ed in the NYT. Both approaches require widespread testing to permit tracking and isolating of those...

    - Brian Leiter

    Worth noting, if China's numbers seem too good to be true.

    - Brian Leiter

    Yikes! UPDATE: Listening to New York Governor Cuomo's remarks this morning, I learned that the Rhode Island Governor repealed the executive order requiring police to stop cars with NY plates and require the occupants to self-quarantine if they were stopping...

    - Brian Leiter

    Philip J. Ivanhoe, a leading scholar of Chinese and East Asian Philosophy who is currently professor and director of the Institute for Confucian Studies and East Asian Philosophy at Sungkyunkwan University in South Korea, will become professor in and Chair...

    - Brian Leiter

    This is already happening in Europe (and starting to happen here): because the virus spreads primarily through close contact, healthcare workers are at enormous risk, even more so if they lack adequate protective gear, as is increasingly true in the...

    by Tim B-Gray

    Report by Anja Steinbauer

    Brandon Robshaw looks again at Nietzsche’s idea of the eternal repetition of life.

    by Terence Green

    David Birch compares the attitudes of Friedrich Nietzsche and Kanye West.

    Christopher Devlin Brown sees similarities and differences in Nietzsche’s and Plato’s critiques of art.

    Paul Doolan on what Nietzsche thought we can, and can’t, get out of history.

    Paul O’Mahoney considers the awful fate Nietzsche predicts for humanity.

    Toni Vogel Carey wrestles with conflicts of duty.

    Owain Griffin takes a leap beyond the limits of numbers, into concepts.

    - Philosophy Now

    Grant Bartley from Philosophy Now (and author of The Metarevolution) is joined by members of London philosophy groups Philosophy For All and the Philosophical Society of England to debate an argument advanced by PFA member Kieran Quill that according to quantum mechanics the universe is mental in nature. Join us to hear the fallout. First broadcast on 29 June 2014 on Resonance FM.

    - Philosophy Now

    Ludwig Wittgenstein worked out how language has meaning, twice. He also thought that some of the most important things we can know we can’t express at all. Grant Bartley from Philosophy Now finds out the meaning and limits of language from guest Daniel Hutto from the University of Wollongong, NSW. First broadcast on 22 June 2014 on Resonance FM.

    - Philosophy Now

    Might Nietzsche be right, claiming that lying is “a condition of life?” – Or Kant, arguing that lying means annihilating human dignity? Is it ever acceptable for governments to lie to the public or for individuals to lie to the government? Anja Steinbauer is joined by politician and philosopher Shahrar Ali and moral philosopher Piers Benn to discuss whether lying can be a good thing. First broadcast on 15 June 2014 on Resonance FM.

    - Philosophy Now

    What is meta-ethics? How does meta-ethics differ from ethics, and what does it tell us about ethics? Why is it important for how we should live our lives? Join Grant Bartley from Philosophy Now and his guests Edward Harcourt from Keble College, Oxford, and Richard Rowland from the University of Warwick, to find the answers to these questions and more. First broadcast on 8 June 2014 on Resonance FM.

    - Philosophy Now

    Join Grant Bartley from Philosophy Now and guests John Callanan from King’s College, London, and Andrew Ward from the University of York to talk about the most important idea you’ve never heard of, and some other persuasive arguments from revolutionary but unfortunately unknown-to-the-world philosopher Immanuel Kant. First broadcast on 1 June 2014 on Resonance FM.

    - Philosophy Now

    Join Grant Bartley from Philosophy Now and guests Philip Goff from the University of Liverpool and Tom McClelland from the University of Manchester as they try to work out how all that electricity between your nerve cells relates to and produces all your experiences and thoughts. First broadcast on 25 May 2014 on Resonance FM.

    - Philosophy Now

    What has Buddhism to offer the 21st Century? Join Anja Steinbauer and her guests, Martin Muchall and Rick Lewis, for a critical discussion of ideas in and about Buddhism. First broadcast on 18 May 2014 on Resonance FM.

    - Philosophy Now

    Isaiah Berlin said of David Hume, “No man has influenced the history of philosophy to a deeper or more disturbing degree.” Join Grant Bartley from Philosophy Now plus guests Jane O’Grady, Peter Kail and James Arnold to find out why. First broadcast on 11 May 2014 on Resonance FM.

    - Philosophy Now

    Look inside the mind of a famous thinker: Grant Bartley from Philosophy Now and writer Daryn Green talk to author and Philosophy Now columnist Raymond Tallis about his latest book, In Defence of Wonder, and about the influences and motivations which have made him a philosopher. Recorded on 31 May 2012.

    - Philosophy Now

    Both philosophy and literature represent the world and reflect on it. They are clearly different, yet converge, overlap and relate to one another in various ways. Can anything be gained philosophically by examining literature? Conversely, does it add to our understanding of literature to look at it from a philosophical point of view? Anja Steinbauer, President of Philosophy For All, and her guests Gregory Currie from the University of Nottingham, Stacie Friend from Heythrop College, University of London, and Edward Harcourt from Keble College, University of Oxford, discuss truth and ethics in philosophy and literature. First broadcast on 27 March 2012 on Resonance FM.

    - Neil Levy

    Written by Neil Levy These are scary times. The death toll from Covid-19 raises hour by hour and in most countries the rate of new infections continues to grow. While most of us know that if we contract the virus the disease will likely be mild for us, we have friends and family who are […]

    - admin

    This essay received an honourable mention in the undergraduate category. Written by University of Oxford student, Angelo Ryu.   Introduction  The scope of modern administration is vast. We expect the state to perform an ever-increasing number of tasks, including the provision of services and the regulation of economic activity. This requires the state to make […]

    - admin

    This essay was the runner up in the graduate category of the 6th Annual Oxford Uehiro Prize in Practical Ethics. Written by University of Oxford student Matthew Minehan. INTRODUCTION Sally is a healthy young woman who suffers catastrophic brain trauma. Over many months, her doctors subject her to functional Magnetic Resonance Imagining (fMRI) scans and […]

    - admin

    This essay was the winning entry in the graduate category of the 6th Annual Oxford Uehiro Prize in Practical Ethics. Written by University of Oxford student, Maya Krishnan.   Introduction Late one night in Managua, Nicaragua, a man punched Leslie Jamison in the face and then ran away with her camera. Jamison called the police. […]

    - admin

    This essay was the runner up in the undergraduate category of the 6th Annual Oxford Uehiro Prize in Practical Ethics Written by University of Oxford student Toby Lowther In this paper, I discuss the question of whether science can ethically make use of data which has been gathered by unethical means in seeking scientific and […]

    - Julian Savulescu

    By Julian Savulescu Cross-posted from The Guardian The race is on to find a treatment for coronavirus. This race is split between two approaches: the trialling of pre-existing drugs used for similar diseases, and the hunt for a vaccine. In both instances, important ethical decisions must be made. Is it OK to reassign a treatment that […]

    - admin

    This essay was the winning entry in the undergraduate category of the 6th Annual Oxford Uehiro Prize in Practical Ethics. Written by University of Oxford student, Eric Sheng. In the computer game Red Dead Redemption 2 (henceforward, RDR2), players control a character in a virtual world. Among the characters represented by computer graphics but not […]

    - admin

    Written by Dr Thomas Douglas Dr Tom Douglas has recently published a fascinating article on the Stockholm Centre, For the Ethics of War and Peace blog: As I write this, COVID-19, an illness caused by the new coronavirus SARS-CoV-2, is sweeping the globe. Over 15,000 people have died, and it is likely that at least […]

    - Hazem Zohny

    Written by Hazem Zohny In times of crises, the archetypal ethicist sits in the proverbial armchair and hums and haws, testing out intuitions about an action or policy against a jumble of moral theories. Covid-19 shows why the archetypal ethicist is as useless as antibiotics are for viral infections. This is because virtually all the […]