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    - Edmonds and Warburton

    Some philosophers have drawn very strange conclusions about the nature of reality. Despite this Emily Thomas believes that their work may still be worth studying. They usually have had good reasons for what they concluded. In this episode of the Philosophy Bites podcast she discusses several wildly implausible metaphysical theories with Nigel Warburton

    We are grateful for support from the Marc Sanders Foundation and from our Patreon donors. 

    - Edmonds and Warburton

    Are thought experiments the best way of doing practical ethics? Not according to James Wilson. He thinks we need the rich detail of real cases or complex imaginary cases not a simplified version of reality to make sense of the moral problems we face. 

    We are grateful for support for this episode from the Marc Sanders Foundation and from our supporters on Patreon. 

    - Edmonds and Warburton

    In this episode of the Philosophy Bites podcast, Kate Kirkpatrick, author of a new biography of Beauvoir, Becoming Beauvoir, discusses the relationship between the life and work of Simone de Beauvoir. Beauvoir is often portrayed as applying Jean-Paul Sartre's existentialism to the condition of women. Is this a fair assessment?

    We are grateful for support from the Marc Sanders Foundation

    - Edmonds and Warburton

    'What is a woman?' has become a contentious question with practical implications. The philosopher Kathleen Stock gives an account of the category 'woman' and how we should think about it. She gives a different answer to this question which Amia Srinivassan addressed in a previous Philosophy Bites interview on this topic.

    - Edmonds and Warburton

    Christian Miller believes that there is a character gap, a gap between what we think we are like morally and how we actually behave. In this episode of the Philosophy Bites podcast he explores the psychology of moral behaviour, and how we can become better people. 

    We are grateful for support from the Marc Sanders Foundation

    - Edmonds and Warburton

    Where did ethics come from? Philip Pettit tells an 'as if' story about the birth of ethics that is designed to illuminate what ethics is and why it evolved on this episode of the Philosophy Bites podcast.

    We are grateful for support from the Marc Sanders Foundation and from Patreon donors for this episode. 

    - Edmonds and Warburton

    Philosophers often talk about possible worlds. Is this just a way of describing counterfactual situations? As Helen Beebee explains, some of them believe that possible worlds actually exist. This episode of the Philosophy Bites podcast is supported by the Marc Sanders Foundation and by Patreon donations. 

    - Edmonds and Warburton

    Throughout its history there have been challenges to the status of philosophy. Paul Sagar discusses some of these in this episode of the Philosophy Bites podcast.

    We are grateful for support from the Marc Sanders Foundation in making this podcast, and for donations from Patreon patrons. 

    - Edmonds and Warburton

    Is it always good to be trustworthy? Can trustworthiness come into conflict with other values, such as generosity? Katherine Hawley discusses these and other questions about trustworthiness with Nigel Warburton in this episode of the Philosophy Bites podcast. 

    We are grateful for support from the Marc Sanders Foundation and from our Patreon subscribers for this episode. 

    - Edmonds and Warburton

    Civility is a conversational virtue that governs how people talk to each other. How important is it in political life? In this episode of the Philosophy Bites podcast Teresa Bejan discusses this manner of speaking and writing and its history. 

    We are grateful for sponsorship for this episode from the Marc Sanders Foundation and from our Patreon patrons

    - Brian Leiter

    Bryan Pickel (metaphysics, philosophy of language, history of analytic philosophy), currently Reader in Philosophy at the University of Edinburgh, has accepted appointment in philosophy at the University of Glasgow, to begin in June 2020.

    - Brian Leiter

    Back in 2008. (I was amused to see that piece was sent to me by Sarah Jeong, who now works for the NYT!)

    - Brian Leiter

    This is an interesting account.

    - Brian Leiter

    - Brian Leiter

    ...at 3:16 AM.

    - Brian Leiter

    It will be officially advertised on PhilJobs in a few weeks, but I wanted to flag that we will again be hiring a Fellow; the ad text is below the fold for anyone interested. Note that the position is open...

    - Brian Leiter

    This is worth reading, and this.

    - Brian Leiter

    (Thanks to Taylor Carman who created this.)

    - Brian Leiter

    Julie Stroud kindly called to my attention the recent memorial for Professor Stroud, which includes remarks by a number of philosophers, including Jason Bridges (Chicago), Janet Broughton (Berkeley), Niko Kolodny (Berkeley), Thomas Nagel (NYU), Antonia Peacocke (Stanford), Samuel Scheffler (NYU),...

    - Brian Leiter

    No comment needed:

    by Rick Lewis

    Locke doc shock in Maryland • Žižek says something controversial again • French MPs debate sex and bioethics — News reports by Anja Steinbauer

    Christopher Ryan takes a dogged look at Schopenhauer’s view of the world.

    Duncan Richter explains why Schopenhauer thinks art, especially music, can provide a kind of salvation.

    Dennis Vanden Auweele looks at Schopenhauer’s response to suffering.

    Sam Woolfe asks if pessimism is a proper response to life or a symptom of depression.

    Hugh Hunter wonders if we’re always free in our use of our free time.

    Waqās Ahmed connects Leonardo’s worldview with systems theory.

    Andrew Notier unfolds the social construction of mathematics for us.

    Susana Badiola wonders how technology will help us understand our selves.

    - Philosophy Now

    Grant Bartley from Philosophy Now (and author of The Metarevolution) is joined by members of London philosophy groups Philosophy For All and the Philosophical Society of England to debate an argument advanced by PFA member Kieran Quill that according to quantum mechanics the universe is mental in nature. Join us to hear the fallout. First broadcast on 29 June 2014 on Resonance FM.

    - Philosophy Now

    Ludwig Wittgenstein worked out how language has meaning, twice. He also thought that some of the most important things we can know we can’t express at all. Grant Bartley from Philosophy Now finds out the meaning and limits of language from guest Daniel Hutto from the University of Wollongong, NSW. First broadcast on 22 June 2014 on Resonance FM.

    - Philosophy Now

    Might Nietzsche be right, claiming that lying is “a condition of life?” – Or Kant, arguing that lying means annihilating human dignity? Is it ever acceptable for governments to lie to the public or for individuals to lie to the government? Anja Steinbauer is joined by politician and philosopher Shahrar Ali and moral philosopher Piers Benn to discuss whether lying can be a good thing. First broadcast on 15 June 2014 on Resonance FM.

    - Philosophy Now

    What is meta-ethics? How does meta-ethics differ from ethics, and what does it tell us about ethics? Why is it important for how we should live our lives? Join Grant Bartley from Philosophy Now and his guests Edward Harcourt from Keble College, Oxford, and Richard Rowland from the University of Warwick, to find the answers to these questions and more. First broadcast on 8 June 2014 on Resonance FM.

    - Philosophy Now

    Join Grant Bartley from Philosophy Now and guests John Callanan from King’s College, London, and Andrew Ward from the University of York to talk about the most important idea you’ve never heard of, and some other persuasive arguments from revolutionary but unfortunately unknown-to-the-world philosopher Immanuel Kant. First broadcast on 1 June 2014 on Resonance FM.

    - Philosophy Now

    Join Grant Bartley from Philosophy Now and guests Philip Goff from the University of Liverpool and Tom McClelland from the University of Manchester as they try to work out how all that electricity between your nerve cells relates to and produces all your experiences and thoughts. First broadcast on 25 May 2014 on Resonance FM.

    - Philosophy Now

    What has Buddhism to offer the 21st Century? Join Anja Steinbauer and her guests, Martin Muchall and Rick Lewis, for a critical discussion of ideas in and about Buddhism. First broadcast on 18 May 2014 on Resonance FM.

    - Philosophy Now

    Isaiah Berlin said of David Hume, “No man has influenced the history of philosophy to a deeper or more disturbing degree.” Join Grant Bartley from Philosophy Now plus guests Jane O’Grady, Peter Kail and James Arnold to find out why. First broadcast on 11 May 2014 on Resonance FM.

    - Philosophy Now

    Look inside the mind of a famous thinker: Grant Bartley from Philosophy Now and writer Daryn Green talk to author and Philosophy Now columnist Raymond Tallis about his latest book, In Defence of Wonder, and about the influences and motivations which have made him a philosopher. Recorded on 31 May 2012.

    - Philosophy Now

    Both philosophy and literature represent the world and reflect on it. They are clearly different, yet converge, overlap and relate to one another in various ways. Can anything be gained philosophically by examining literature? Conversely, does it add to our understanding of literature to look at it from a philosophical point of view? Anja Steinbauer, President of Philosophy For All, and her guests Gregory Currie from the University of Nottingham, Stacie Friend from Heythrop College, University of London, and Edward Harcourt from Keble College, University of Oxford, discuss truth and ethics in philosophy and literature. First broadcast on 27 March 2012 on Resonance FM.

    - Gabriel De Marco

    written by Gabriel De Marco I recently started to watch The Good Place again, a sitcom by NBC which takes place in the realm of the supernatural. The show has taken us to the good place (somewhat like heaven, where good people go after they have shuffled off their mortal coil), the bad place (the […]

    - Rebecca Brown

    Written by Rebecca Brown In June this year, the Advertising Standards Authority (ASA) brought into effect a ban on harmful gender stereotypes in advertising. In response to public outcry about adverts such as the 2015 ‘Are you beach body ready?’ campaign by Protein World, and growing discomfort with outdated depictions of gender roles in the […]

    - Katrien Devolder

    Should we use genetic testing to choose what type of children to bring into the world, and if so, how should we choose? Is it acceptable to choose a deaf child? Should we choose our children on the basis of non-disease traits such as intelligence if that were possible ? Does genetic selection put too […]

    - Adam Shriver

    Panpsychism is the view that sentience is ubiquitous in the world. Some people find it attractive because it sidesteps the challenge for dualists of explaining why there are two radically different types of things in the world, physical things and mental things.  And panpsychism seems to avoid some of of the challenges that face physicalist […]

    - Katrien Devolder

    In this interview with Katrien Devolder, Peter Singer defends the Global Kidney Exchange (GKE) programme, which matches donor–recipient pairs across high-income, medium-income, and low-income countries. The GKE has been accused of being a form of organ trafficking, exploiting the poor, and involving coercion and commodification of donors. Peter Singer refutes these claims, and argues that […]

    - Neil Levy

    Written by Neil Levy It is an entrenched and central principle of journalistic ethics that the subjects of stories must have an opportunity to respond to them; comment must be sought. These comments are then published in any resulting story. For example, the Society of Professional Journalists code of ethics requires journalists to “[d]iligently seek […]

    - Dominic Wilkinson

    Recommendation for life support from 22 weeks. Kristina Bessolova/Shutterstock Dominic Wilkinson, University of Oxford When new guidance relating to the outcome and medical care of babies born extremely prematurely was recently released, it led some to call for UK abortion law to be revised. This was because one of the new recommendations from the British […]

    - admin

    Graduate and undergraduate students currently enrolled at the University of Oxford in any subject are invited to enter the Oxford Uehiro Prize in Practical Ethics by submitting an essay of up to 2000 words on any topic relevant to practical ethics.  Eligibility includes visiting students who are registered as recognized students, and paying fees, but […]

    - admin

    BY CARISSA VÉLIZ This article was originally published in New Statesman America GETTY IMAGES / JUSTIN SULLIVAN People often give a personal explanation of whether they protect the privacy of their data. Those who don’t care much about privacy might say that they have nothing to hide. Those who do worry about it might say […]

    - Doug McConnell

    Written by Doug McConnell Everywhere we look environmentalists are being exposed as hypocrites. But is this relevant to the arguments these environmentalists are making and, if not, how can we improve the quality of public debate on environmental issues? In August, Prince Harry and Meghan Markle used 4 private jet flights over 11 days while […]