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    - Edmonds and Warburton
    David Bather Woods on Schopenhauer on Compassion

    Arthur Schopenhauer is best known for the deep pessimism of his book The World as Will and Representation. Here we focus on a slightly less pessimistic aspect of his philosophy: his views on compassion. Very unusually for an early nineteenth century thinker, he was influenced here by his reading of Indian philosophy. David Bather Woods is the interviewee.

    We are very grateful for sponsorship for this episode from St John's College.

    - Edmonds and Warburton
    Samantha Rose Hill on Hannah Arendt on Pluralism

    Hannah Arendt's experience of the Eichmann trial in 1961 led her to reflect on the nature of politics, truth, and plurality. Samantha Rose Hill, author of a biography of Arendt, discusses the context for this, and the key features of Arendt's views.  We are grateful for support for this episode from St John's College - for more information about the college, including online options, go to sjc.edu/podcast

    - Edmonds and Warburton
    David Edmonds on Undercover Robot

    David Edmonds has co-authored a children's book, Undercover Robot. Here in this bonus episode (originally released on the Thinking Books podcast) he discusses it with Nigel Warburton. 

    - Edmonds and Warburton
    Steven Nadler on Spinoza on Death

    Baruch Spinoza was perhaps most famous for his equation of God with Nature - a view that his contemporaries, probably correctly, took to be atheist. But what did he think about death? Steven Nadler, author of A Book Forged in Hell and Think Least of Death, discusses this aspect of his thought with Nigel Warburton.

     

    - Edmonds and Warburton
    Kate Manne on Misogyny and Male Entitlement

    In this episode of the Philosophy Bites podcast Cornell philosopher Kate Manne discusses the notions of misogyny, male entitlement, and the term that she coined 'himpathy' with Nigel Warburton.

    - Edmonds and Warburton
    Liam Bright on Verificationism

    Verificationists believe that every meaningful statement is either true by definition or else empirically verifiable (or falsifiable). Anything which fails to pass this two-pronged test for meaningfulness is neither true nor false, but literally meaningless. Liam Bright discusses Verificationism and its links with the Vienna Circle with David Edmonds in this episode of the Philosophy Bites podcast. 

    - Edmonds and Warburton
    David Edmonds on Wittgenstein's Poker

    For this special episode of the Philosophy Bites podcast (produced under lockdown) Nigel Warburton interviews David Edmonds about his bestselling book, written with David Edinow, Wittgenstein's Poker. It focuses on a heated argument between the two great Viennese philosophers Karl Popper and Ludwig Wittgenstein, and the differing accounts that were give of it by those who were there. 

     

    - Edmonds and Warburton
    Nigel Warburton on A Little History of Philosophy

    For this first of two special lockdown episodes of Philosophy Bites we interviewed each other. Here David Edmonds interviews Nigel Warburton about his bestseller A Little History of Philosophy. In the companion episode Nigel interviews David about his bestseller Wittgenstein's Poker.

    - Edmonds and Warburton
    Cheryl Misak on Frank Ramsey and Ludwig Wittgenstein

    Cheryl Misak has recently published a biography of F.P. Ramsey, the great Cambridge thinker who died at the age of only 26, but who nevertheless made a significant impact in several different fields including philosophy, mathematics, and economics. In this episode of the Philosophy Bites podcast she discusses Ramsey's interactions with Wittgenstein. The two thinkers had very different personal styles and their philosophies reflect this.

    - Edmonds and Warburton
    Philip Goff on Galileo and Consciousness

    Philip Goff discusses some of Galileo's insights into the nature of matter. He then goes on to discuss his own view about consciousness, panpsychism. Goff believes that matter is conscious at some level. 

    - Brian Leiter
    It's been hard to find a clear answer to this in the media. The most common surmise I've seen is that the new variant reproduces more in the nose and throat, and so people expel more of it when they...
    - Brian Leiter
    A poll, and discussion, back in 2013.
    - Brian Leiter
    An account here; an excerpt: Covid-19 patients who recovered from the disease still have robust immunity from the coronavirus eight months after infection, according to a new study.... [T]he new study does show that a small number of recovered people...
    - Brian Leiter
    Interesting essay by philosopher Aaron Preston (Valparaiso), about an aspect of King's thought I was not familiar with.
    - Brian Leiter
    This is creepy beyond belief. (Thanks to Jason Stanley for calling it to my attention.)
    - Brian Leiter
    Here. (Earlier coverage.) Comments are open for those with more information, additional links, etc. Submit comments only once, they may take awhile to appear. (Thanks to Zena Hitz for the pointer.)
    - Brian Leiter
    This is pretty remarkable and appalling. Although most Capitol police did their job, a few were clearly on the side of the rioters.
    - Brian Leiter
    Philosopher Teresa Marques (Barcelona) writes with an interesting observation: The importance of this letter is not the in-fighting among factions in philosophy, but the broader conflict of rights at issue, and threats to academic freedom in universities around the world...
    - Brian Leiter
    Today would have been my father's 88th birthday, had he not been an early victim of the COVID disaster in the United States. In lieu of the usual "obscure" rock 'n' roll, I thought I would post instead one of...
    - Brian Leiter
    A list of programs here. (What each program counts as "diverse" varies a bit, so do read the descriptions.)
    by Rick Lewis
    Study finds moral choices gendered • Ethics of wiring your brain to a computer • Philosopher rides along Montaigne track — News reports by Anja Steinbauer
    by Matt Qvortrup
    Dustin Gray finds out that continuing to exist isn’t as simple as you might think.
    Lawrence Crocker says it’s about time, and personal identity, and free will.
    by Jenny Maryl
    Kevin Loughran wonders what scientific experiments really tell us about free will.
    Nurana Rajabova is determined to sort it out.
    Siobhan Lyons discovers that free will doesn’t come for free.
    Luc de Brabandere lets us sail with him along the two great rivers of thought that have flowed down the centuries from ancient philosophy into modern computer science, from Plato and Aristotle to Alan Turing and Claude Shannon.
    - Philosophy Now
    The Mental Universe Debate
    Grant Bartley from Philosophy Now (and author of The Metarevolution) is joined by members of London philosophy groups Philosophy For All and the Philosophical Society of England to debate an argument advanced by PFA member Kieran Quill that according to quantum mechanics the universe is mental in nature. Join us to hear the fallout. First broadcast on 29 June 2014 on Resonance FM.
    - Philosophy Now
    The Linguistic Wizardry of Ludwig Wittgenstein
    Ludwig Wittgenstein worked out how language has meaning, twice. He also thought that some of the most important things we can know we can’t express at all. Grant Bartley from Philosophy Now finds out the meaning and limits of language from guest Daniel Hutto from the University of Wollongong, NSW. First broadcast on 22 June 2014 on Resonance FM.
    - Philosophy Now
    Philosophy, Lies and Politics
    Might Nietzsche be right, claiming that lying is “a condition of life?” – Or Kant, arguing that lying means annihilating human dignity? Is it ever acceptable for governments to lie to the public or for individuals to lie to the government? Anja Steinbauer is joined by politician and philosopher Shahrar Ali and moral philosopher Piers Benn to discuss whether lying can be a good thing. First broadcast on 15 June 2014 on Resonance FM.
    - Philosophy Now
    Beyond Right and Wrong
    What is meta-ethics? How does meta-ethics differ from ethics, and what does it tell us about ethics? Why is it important for how we should live our lives? Join Grant Bartley from Philosophy Now and his guests Edward Harcourt from Keble College, Oxford, and Richard Rowland from the University of Warwick, to find the answers to these questions and more. First broadcast on 8 June 2014 on Resonance FM.
    - Philosophy Now
    The Hidden World of Immanuel Kant
    Join Grant Bartley from Philosophy Now and guests John Callanan from King’s College, London, and Andrew Ward from the University of York to talk about the most important idea you’ve never heard of, and some other persuasive arguments from revolutionary but unfortunately unknown-to-the-world philosopher Immanuel Kant. First broadcast on 1 June 2014 on Resonance FM.
    - Philosophy Now
    How Come Consciousness?
    Join Grant Bartley from Philosophy Now and guests Philip Goff from the University of Liverpool and Tom McClelland from the University of Manchester as they try to work out how all that electricity between your nerve cells relates to and produces all your experiences and thoughts. First broadcast on 25 May 2014 on Resonance FM.
    - Philosophy Now
    Buddhist Philosophy
    What has Buddhism to offer the 21st Century? Join Anja Steinbauer and her guests, Martin Muchall and Rick Lewis, for a critical discussion of ideas in and about Buddhism. First broadcast on 18 May 2014 on Resonance FM.
    - Philosophy Now
    Impressions of David Hume
    Isaiah Berlin said of David Hume, “No man has influenced the history of philosophy to a deeper or more disturbing degree.” Join Grant Bartley from Philosophy Now plus guests Jane O’Grady, Peter Kail and James Arnold to find out why. First broadcast on 11 May 2014 on Resonance FM.
    - Philosophy Now
    In Defence of Wonder
    Look inside the mind of a famous thinker: Grant Bartley from Philosophy Now and writer Daryn Green talk to author and Philosophy Now columnist Raymond Tallis about his latest book, In Defence of Wonder, and about the influences and motivations which have made him a philosopher. Recorded on 31 May 2012.
    - Philosophy Now
    Philosophy and Literature
    Both philosophy and literature represent the world and reflect on it. They are clearly different, yet converge, overlap and relate to one another in various ways. Can anything be gained philosophically by examining literature? Conversely, does it add to our understanding of literature to look at it from a philosophical point of view? Anja Steinbauer, President of Philosophy For All, and her guests Gregory Currie from the University of Nottingham, Stacie Friend from Heythrop College, University of London, and Edward Harcourt from Keble College, University of Oxford, discuss truth and ethics in philosophy and literature. First broadcast on 27 March 2012 on Resonance FM.
    - Julian Savulescu
    Written by Julian Savulescu and Jonathan Pugh The current UK approach to allocating limited life-saving resources is on the basis of need. Guidance issued by The General Medical Council states that all doctors must “Make sure that decisions about setting priorities that affect patients are fair and based on clinical need and the likely effectiveness […]
    - Roger Crisp
    Written by Roger Crisp Imagine two worlds quite different from our own. In Non-intervention, if a person becomes ill with some life-threatening condition, though their pain may be alleviated, no attempt is made to save their lives. In Maximal-intervention, everything possible is done to save the lives of those with life-threatening conditions. Our world lies […]
    - admin
    Written by University of Oxford student Brian Wong Philosophy should, to some extent, be a publicly oriented activity: we hope to make sense of first-order questions concerning how we ought to live, what existence is, what we know, and also deeper questions concerning our methodologies and ways of thinking. Yet philosophical writing has long been […]
    - Charles Foster
    By Charles Foster Arthur Conan Doyle’s estate has issued proceedings, complaining that Enola Holmes,  a recently released film about Sherlock Holmes’ sister, portrays the great detective as too emotional. Sherlock Holmes was famously suspicious of emotions. 1 ‘ [L]ove is an emotional thing’, he icily observed, ‘and whatever is emotional is opposed to that true […]
    - Brian D. Earp
    PRESS RELEASE: Free all non-violent criminals jailed on minor drug offences, say experts Non-violent offenders serving time for drug use or possession should be freed immediately and their convictions erased, according to research published in the peer-reviewed The American Journal of Bioethics. More than 60 international experts including world-leading bioethicists, psychologists and drug experts have […]
    - Stephen Rainey
    This Machine Kills Viruses
    Written by Stephen Rainey If we had a machine that could eradicate coronavirus at the press of a button, there would likely be a queue to do the honours. Rather than having such a device, we have a science-policy interface, and a general context of democratic legitimacy. This isn’t a push-button, but a complex of […]
    - Jonathan Pugh
    By Jonathan Pugh This article was originally published here by the Conversation, on 22nd Dec 2020   The mass testing of asymptomatic people for COVID-19 in the UK was thrown into question by a recent study. In a pilot in Liverpool, over half the cases weren’t picked up, leading some to question whether using tests that perform […]
    - Gabriel De Marco
    Written by Ben Davies and Gabriel De Marco The UK governments in Westminster and the devolved nations (Northern Ireland, Scotland and Wales) have made a recent about-turn regarding Christmas. Where there were previously plans to relax Covid-related restrictions for five days, they will now be relaxed for only Christmas itself, and not at all in […]
    - Doug McConnell
    Dementia, Pagal, or Neurocognitive Disorder: What Is In a Name?
    By Doug McConnell   A recent BBC news story has drawn attention to the fact that there isn’t a word for “dementia” in many South Asian languages and some South Asian people living in the UK still use the stigmatising Punjabi word “pagal”, meaning “crazy” or “mad”. The news story implicitly assumes that the word […]
    - Ben Davies
    Written by Ben Davies and Joshua Parker “COVID-19: Do not resuscitate orders might have been put in place without consent, watchdog says”. This recent headline followed an investigation by the Care Quality Commission into Do Not Attempt Cardio-Pulmonary Resuscitation (DNACPR) decisions early in the pandemic. In a recent post, Dominic Wilkinson highlights two misconceptions in […]